Vesalius (1514-1564) gets under your skin in Leuven

Vesalius (1514-1564) gets under your skin in Leuven

Monday, November 24, 2014 — From 1 October 2014 until 18 January 2015, the historic university town of Leuven is showcase Vesalius, his life and his work. Various cultural organisations in Leuven and the university have been inspired by Vesalius and the human body, and are presenting a rich and varied programme of exhibitions, dance, music, performing arts, city tours, lectures and much more besides. There are activities and events for both young and old, and for both locals and visitors from Flanders, Belgium and beyond. The beating heart of the citywide cultural project is the exhibition Vesalius. Imagining the Body  at M - Museum Leuven.

Curator Geert Vanpaemel, historian of science at the University of Leuven, illustrates Vesalius’ indelible impact on the medical anatomical tradition and on artistic conceptions of the human body. By contrast to his predecessors and colleagues, Vesalius dared to question accepted medical wisdom. What’s more, he even performed dissections on the corpses of executed criminals.

Vesalius. Imagining the Body transports its visitors to the life and times of the legendary anatomist and scientist. It explores his travels, studies at the University of Leuven and his career as court physician. As the highpoint of his career, you can discover the magnificent woodcuts from his ground-breaking book De Humani Corporis Fabrica. In other words: the scientific atlas of the human body and the primary reference work for anatomy and modern medicine until the present day. Not only does the book provide meticulously detailed anatomical descriptions of the entire human body, it also contains exceptionally high-quality illustrations, probably executed in the studio of the Italian artist Titian. The beautiful anatomical plates inspired both physicians and artists for hundreds of years.

The exhibition covers anatomical representations of the human body in both Vesalius’ period and later, and illustrates his influence on the evolution of perceptions of the human body. He is treated as a humanist scholar who both emulated his Greek scientific predecessors and heralded a new tradition in the study of medicine. Throughout the centuries, however, anatomical imaging continued to evolve. The exhibition presents an overview of various art forms throughout different periods upon which Vesalius’ way of looking at and representing the body had in indisputable influence. What began as a scientific fascination for the human body soon influenced the artistic representation of all aspects of the body.

Thanks to the new era ushered in by Vesalius, anatomical theatres became scientific places of work. The exhibition reconstructs a life-sized copy of this type of wooden amphitheatre in which spectacular dissections – that sometimes lasted weeks – were performed in public. You can also admire the ‘muscle men’, examine life-sized anatomical drawings by Jan Wandelaar and prints by Jacques-Fabian Gautier d’Agoty, wax models by André-Pierre Pinson, Clemente Susini and Carlo Calenzuoli, the Glass Man from Dresden, the Smugglerius by William Pink, The Age of Bronze (L’Âge d’airain in French) by Auguste Rodin and anatomical studies by Henri Matisse and Paul Cézanne.

The majority of the pieces displayed in the exhibition are from museums, archives, libraries and the medical collections of art academies.

Running parallel to these events, M is also hosting an exhibition of the work of contemporary artist Markus Schinwald (Salzburg, °1973). The first solo exhibition in Belgium by the Austrian artist immerses you in a surreal atmosphere. Schinwald and Vesalius indisputably share a fascination for the human body, and keep exploring and questioning it continuously.

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An initiative of KU[N]ST Leuven vzw, a cooperation between the city of Leuven and KU Leuven

In cooperation with M – Museum Leuven

Cultural partners: 30CC, Academie van het Leives Dialect, Alfagen, Braakland/Zhebilding, fABULEUS, Farmaleuven, M- Museum Leuven, KU Leuven, Festival  van Vlaanderen Vlaams Brabant, VIB, Frascati Symphonic, Histaruz, Lectio, LUCA School of Arts, SLAC/Academie Beeldende Kunst, STUK, 
UZ Leuven, Vormingplus Oost-Brabant, Werktank and Toerisme Leuven.

 

(c) Isabelle Arthuis
Auguste Rodin, The Bronze Age (c) Isabelle Arthuis
Woman in: Jacques-Fabian Gautier d’Agoty, Myologie complette en couleur et grandeur naturelle, composée de l’essai et de la suite de l’essai d’anatomie en tableaux imprimés. A Paris, chez le sieur Gautier, seul graveur privilégié du Roy, ruë Saint Honoré, au coin de la rue Saint Nicaise […], 1746 © Royal Library of Belgium, inv. II 16.779 E 1.
Auguste Rodin, The Bronze Age (c) Isabelle Arthuis
Anatomical theater, Joannes Blaeu, Toonneel der steden van de Vereenighde Nederlanden, met hare beschrijvingen, Amsterdam, 1649 © Royal Library of Belgium, inv. III 94.530 E
Frontispice de: André Vésale, De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem, Bâle, 1543 © KU Leuven, Bibliothèque universitaire, inv. CaaC17 – Bruno Vandermeulen.
Portrait of Andreas Vesalius in: Andreas Vesalius, De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem, Basel, 1543 © KU Leuven, University Library, inv. CaaC17 – Bruno Vandermeulen
(c) Isabelle Arthuis
Franz Tschackert, Transparant man (c) Isabelle Arthuis
Hanging corps in: Andreas Vesalius, De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem, Basel, 1543 © KU Leuven, University Library, inv. CaaC17 – Bruno Vandermeulen
Jan Wandelaar, Preparatory drawing of a skeleton for Albinus, Tabulae sceleti et musculorum [Cat. 34], black chalk and grey wash, on paper, 1726 © University Library, Leyden, inv. BPL 1914 III.
Muscle man in: Andreas Vesalius, De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem, Basel, 1543 © KU Leuven, University Library, inv. CaaC17 – Bruno Vandermeulen
William Pink after Agostini Carlini, Smugglerius, plaster, 1834 (c) Isabelle Arthuis
Clemente Susini, Innervation of the face, 1798. © Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, Paris - Direction des bibliothèques et de la documentation.
Andreas Vesalius, [Jobst de Necker], De Tabulae Anatomicae : Ein gar künstlichs allen Leyb und Wundaertzen auch andrer Künsten Lieb habern hochnützlichs Werck in sechs Figur gebracht mit Inhalt aller Blutschlag und Flachsadern, sampt der Gehaynen des gantzen Leybs, und wie ein yedes seinem Ursprung empfahe und also eins aus dem andern volge, dem andern Hilff oder Nachteyle bringe, gar fleyssig un artlich beschriben un anzeygt, ca. 1540 © Royal Library of Belgium, inv. Imp II 42.417 C Est.
Franz Tschackert, Transparant man, 1930 © Deutsches Hygiene Museum, Dresden, inv. Volker Kreidler 1962.
(c) Isabelle Arthuis
William Pink after Agostini Carlini, Smugglerius, plaster, 1834 (c) Isabelle Arthuis
William Pink after Agostini Carlini, Smugglerius, plaster, 1834 (c) Isabelle Arthuis
Man in: Jacques-Fabian Gautier d’Agoty, Myologie complette en couleur et grandeur naturelle, composée de l’essai et de la suite de l’essai d’anatomie en tableaux imprimés. A Paris, chez le sieur Gautier, seul graveur privilégié du Roy, ruë Saint Honoré, au coin de la rue Saint Nicaise […], 1746 © Royal Library of Belgium, inv. II 16.779 E 1.
Jan Wandelaar, Preparatory drawing of a skeleton for Albinus, Tabulae sceleti et musculorum [Cat. 34], black chalk and grey wash, on paper, 1726 © University Library, Leyden, inv. BPL 1914 III.
Jan Wandelaar, Preparatory drawing of a skeleton for Albinus, Tabulae sceleti et musculorum [Cat. 34], black chalk and grey wash, on paper, 1726 © University Library, Leyden, inv. BPL 1914 III.